Architect: CFM Group, LLC (Tuscaloosa, Alabama)

Project Location: Bayou La Batre, Alabama

The Seafood Waste Processing Plant was built on ten acres of a 95-acre site near several waterfront seafood processing facilities in Bayou La Batre, AL. It is one of the only industrial facilities in the state to be certified through the U.S. Green building council's LEED Rating System - the industry leader for green buildings.

The shrimp and crab waste processing plant, built for The Gulf Coast Agricultural Seafood Cooperative, also known as The Coop, has the capacity to process over 5,000 tons of shrimp and crab waste generated annually from coop members' processing plants in the surrounding area.

Typically, during peak seafood season, the 25 southwestern Alabama cooperative members pay to have 100 cubic yards of crab and shrimp waste hauled each day to a landfill. The new plant will process, dehydrate and convert seafood waste into marketable products such as animal feed, organic fertilizer and pottery. The plant also will employ cost-effective, innovative environmental engineering throughout and it is powered by renewable energy sources including solar energy and geothermal technology.

The 13,000-square-foot facility features a pre-engineered metal building that employs environmentally-friendly practices to treat the by-products of the seafood processing industry and dispose of associated waste and fumes. Special structure features include a biogas processing system with anaerobic digesters, aerobic lagoons, bio-filters, concrete and steel retention tanks, methane gas bladders, candlestick flares and wetland restorations.


Customer Testimonials


"The groundbreaking marks a great day for Bayou La Batre and the seafood industry," said Walton Kraver, president of the Gulf Coast Agriculture and Seafood Cooperative and owner of Deep Sea Foods Inc., Jubilee Foods Inc., Malay Bay Inc. and Country Inc.

During peak seafood season, the 25 southwestern Alabama cooperative members pay to have 100 cubic yards of crab and shrimp waste hauled each day to a landfill, Kraver said. The new facility will allow the cooperative to use "green" practices to covert those seafood byproducts into marketable products such as animal feed, organic fertilizer and pottery, he said.

"We are taking a product that is damaging to the environment and we are treating the product in a very environmentally friendly way and transforming it into something we can sell, generating income for the industry as a whole, which consists of thousands of workers," states Kraver. "This facility will serve the seafood industry for generations to come."